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Behavioral Therapy for Improved Bladder Control

CAMC Physician's Group - Urology logo

Behavioral Therapy for Improved Bladder Control

  1. Urge control techniques
    A. Stop whatever you are doing and concentrate on contracting your pelvic floor muscles.
    B. Contract your pelvic floor muscles repetitively (as in your "flick" exercises).
    C. Once the urgency has subsided, realize that sometimes the urgency is because you have a
    full bladder and have to urinate. Other times the urgency is a false signal and you do not
    have a full bladder.
    D. If you have urgency triggered by running water, "key in the door," getting up from a sitting position, etc., contract your pelvic floor muscles prior to initiating the activity.
     
  2. Daily fluid intake
    A. Avoid drinking too little (less than 3 cups/day) or drinking too much (more than 6 cups/day).
    B. Avoid caffeinated beverages.
    C. If voiding frequently at night, limit your liquid intake after 7 p.m.
     
  3. Bowel regularity – constipation makes bladder symptoms worse
    A. Drink enough liquids and eat plenty of high fiber food.
    B. Exercise.
    C. Avoid laxatives and enemas on a regular basis, which decrease the bowel's normal function.
     
  4. Voiding schedules
    A. Empty your bladder at 1½ to 2 hour intervals even if you may not have the urge to urinate at that time. You may gradually increase the time between voidings to 30 minutes, until you can comfortably void every 3 hours.
    B. If you are voiding more frequently than every 1½ to 2 hours, resist the urge to go by using urge control techniques (described in #1).

 

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