Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, visiting hours are currently restricted. Please visit the COVID-19 page or click here for current visitor information.

Common Gastrointestinal Conditions

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder that affects the large intestine (colon). IBS commonly causes cramping, abdominal pain, bloating, gas, diarrhea and constipation. IBS is a chronic condition that you will need to manage long term.

Even though signs and symptoms are uncomfortable, IBS – unlike ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, which are forms of inflammatory bowel disease – doesn’t cause changes in bowel tissue or increase your risk of colorectal cancer.

Only a small number of people with irritable bowel syndrome have severe signs and symptoms. Some people can control their symptoms by managing diet, lifestyle and stress. Others will need medication and counseling.

Colorectal Cancer

Colorectal (large bowel) cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the inner lining of the colon or rectum. Together, the colon and rectum make up the large bowel or large intestine. The large intestine is the last segment of the digestive system (the esophagus, stomach and small intestine are the first three sections).

The large bowel’s main job is to reabsorb water from the contents of the intestine so that solid waste can be expelled into the toilet. The first several feet of the large intestine is the colon, and the last 6 inches is the rectum.

Pancreatitis Acute/Chronic

Pancreatitis is a condition characterized by abrupt inflammation of the pancreas characterized by swelling and, at times, even destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The most common causes of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and excessive alcohol consumption.

Other causes include smoking, high triglyceride levels, high calcium levels, certain medications, abdominal trauma, viral infections, structural anatomic anomalies and genetic anomalies. Chronic pancreatitis occurs when there is irreversible scar tissue that forms in the pancreas as a result of ongoing inflammation.